How are your allergies affected by climate change?

One effect of climate change is that spring comes sooner and summer stays longer.  A longer summer makes ragweed and other plants pump out more pollen — making us miserable. An analysis of pollen data for the past few decades shows that the pollen producing season of ragweed has increased by up to 27 days as you go north from Oklahoma up into Canada. This is undeniable evidence of a warming world. Unfortunately, for folks like me, with a terrible allergy to ragweed, this is bad news.  Fortunately, I don’t have asthma, but for those who do, it’s even worse. Asthma can be triggered by allergies to pollen, and it can be life-threatening. Also, if that weren’t bad enough, recent evidence shows that in a warming world, the combo of increasing levels Read More …

Ozone and Climate Change: The deadly truth

Ever seen a thick layer of haze hanging over a city in the summer?  That’s ozone.  I remember years back, mountain biking in the summer heat at South Mountain Park in Phoenix, Arizona. I would ride up the mountain until I was eye level with the layer of blue haze.  I used to think, “This can’t be good.”  Maybe that’s why old Doc Goodwell gets a little wheeze every now and again.  Who knows. Anyhow, the recent proposed change in the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulation governing ozone has brought it back into the spotlight.  The EPA wants to lower the maximum amount of ground level ozone from 75 parts per billion (ppb), to 65 or 70 ppb.  Of course, conservative pundits and politicians were in an immediate uproar, stating Read More …